The Team

I’d like to introduce you to our team of dogs. Although specific dogs for the clinical trials have not been chosen yet, these dogs have helped form A Sniff Away and are the core of our Foundation.
Moo

Moo

When Moo was only a few days old, she was left behind in a locked in a shed, along with her mother and littermates, as the owners moved away. Thankfully, neighbors heard the cries, broke the lock and saved the family. We adopted Moo at 9 weeks, and she has been an amazing addition to the family. It was due to Moo that I delved into scent work in my dog training career. She has taught me many things and changed the course of my life. Although she loves being pampered, earning her the nickname of “Diva”, when it comes to scent work she gets down to business and is quite serious about it. She has competed in NACSW sanctioned K9 Nose Work competitions, earning several titles and the prestigious Harry Award.

Baron

Baron

We found Baron during an online search on PetFinder. We came to find out that he was actually in Arkansas- we were still living in New York State. We corresponded with the foster family that was raising him and his littermates and realized, sight unseen, that he was the perfect addition to our family. We met his transport truck in Connecticut one cold February morning, and as soon as we met him, we knew we had made the right decision. He is an exceptional dog with a superior working ethic and lives to work scent. He has earned several titles in NACSW sanctioned K9 Nose Work trials, placing 1st or 2nd overall each time and is now competing and excelling in various scent work venues.

Quincy

Quincy

Quincy is the newest addition to our family. A purebred East Tennessee native Blue Heeler, she and her littermate were found dumped in a parking lot of a shopping plaza. They were rescued and being cared for when we found out she was in need of a home. She was around 6-9 months old at the time she came to live with us. We have since learned that although she is deaf, her sense of smell is extremely sensitive, making her an excellent candidate for scent work. She has been in training for the sport of scent work and her high energy, high working drive and sense of humor make her a fun dog who loves her work and takes it very seriously. I am looking forward to seeing what this unique little dog with a huge character will accomplish.

Rosana C. Dropkin

Rosana C. Dropkin

CBDT, CPDT-KA, CNWI

Rosana has been working with dogs since 2000 and is a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT-KA), a Canine Good Citizen Evaluator, and a long time member of the Association of Professional Dog Trainers (APDT).

Rosana is also a Certified Nose Work Instructor (CNWI) certified through the National Association of Canine Scent Work (NACSW), the original nose work sport for the pet dog. She graduated from their first official CNWI class in June of 2011 and has introduced the sport of K9 Nose Work to east Tennessee. She was the National Score Room Director for NACSW, setting up the score room guidelines and procedures and overseeing the training and approval of score room leads throughout the country. In October of 2016, she resigned from that position as well as that of a Trial Coordinator for NACSW. She is still a Certifying Official and Judge for NACSW sanctioned ORTs and Certifying Official for NACSW sanctioned trials.

Her most recent accomplishment is becoming a Certified Bio Detection Dog Trainer (CBDT). She was certified through the In Situ Foundation, the leading experts in the field of training cancer detection dogs. She was among the first handful of students to graduate from In Situ’s certification course and is very excited to be on the ground floor of this life saving mission.

In November of 2016, I traveled to California where the In Situ Foundation is based and I participated in an intensive bio dog certification program. Along with becoming certified to train medical detection dogs, this program prepared me to approach, engage and collaborate with local medical establishments and present potential research initiatives to medical professionals and universities to be able to conduct clinical trials in this budding yet vital field that can help save lives.

Cancer has always been in my life in one way or another- not only from losing two dear cats and two wonderful dogs to this disease, but my mother passed away from cancer when I was 10 years old. Seeing her go in and out of the hospital, losing her hair from the chemotherapy and getting weaker and weaker over the course of six months was very hard on my family. I could not imagine what she went through in those last few months of her short life.

Cancer treatments have come a long way since then, but being able to help at least one person not have to go through that would be worth it.

- Rosana